Film line-up for FALL 2017

Sept. 14 – THEIR FINEST
Sept. 21 – A GHOST STORY
Sept. 28 – LOST IN PARIS
Oct. 5 – BRIGSBY BEAR
Oct. 12 – THE MIDWIFE
Oct. 19 – LOVING VINCENT
Oct. 26 – MARJORIE PRIME
Nov. 2 – LUCKY
Nov. 9 – AFTER THE STORM

All films start at 7pm at the Paramount Theatre, Victoria street.
See below for more info and film trailers. Tickets

Lucky – Nov 2nd

Director: John Carroll Lynch 1hr 30min. PG. English.

Tickets here

The spiritual journey of a ninety-year-old atheist. Harry Dean Stanton’s last film.
“Harry Dean Stanton’s death not even two weeks ago can’t exactly be called unexpected, given that he was 91 years old. Still, it’s almost as if he deliberately timed it to coincide with the release of Lucky, a film expressly about coming to terms with the prospect that you will soon no longer exist. The directorial debut of ace character actor John Carroll Lynch (Marge’s husband in the movie Fargo, the creepiest suspect in Zodiac, etc.), this lightly eccentric, virtually plotless meditation on mortality would likely have attracted attention under any circumstances—indeed, even had it turned out to be terrible—simply because it offers Stanton his first leading role in a feature film since 1984’s Paris, Texas. (First-time screenwriters Logan Sparks and Drago Sumonja reportedly conceived it with him in mind; it’s hard to imagine who else they might have turned to had he said “No.”) So it’s a remarkable gift to fans and cinephiles that Lucky serves as a first-rate showcase for its star as well as an ideal swan song. The man couldn’t have gone out any better”.-Mike D’Angelo


After the Storm – Nov 9th

Director: Hirokazu Koreeda 1hr 50min. PG. Japanese w/English Subtitles.

Tickets here

From the Director/Writer of OUR LITTLE SISTER, and LIKE FATHER, LIKE SON comes a heart warming story of a father who after the death of his father, struggles to find child support money and reconnect with his son and ex-wife. Calling the film “a classic Japanese family drama of gentle persuasion and staggering simplicity”, which is “beautifully balanced between gentle comedy and the melancholy reality of how people really are,” Deborah Young of The Hollywood Reporter suggests the film is about how “you can’t always have the life you want, or be who you want to be”